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Japan Studies at CUNY

Introduction to the Japan Studies at CUNY

Japanese Theatre at Hunter College
Japanese Business Communication at Hunter College
CUMY BA Alumni Voice: Kimberly Martinez

List of Japan-related Courses at CUNY

If you want to update the information below, please contact Joanna Smolenski (jsmolenski@gradcenter.cuny.edu) or Tomonori Nagano (tnagano@lagcc.cuny.edu).

CampusDisciplineCourse CodeCourse TitleCourse DescriptionContact
BaruchAAS3085Topics in Asian and Asian American StudiesNot currently offered?
BaruchCultureCMP / AAS4906Critical Approaches to Japanese Popular CultureThis course critically examines Japanese popular culture such as popular music (J-pop), pop art, film, manga (Japanese comics), anime, TV shows, and fan/participatory activities. The course may be used as an elective within the Comparative Literature minor, the Asian and Asian and Asian American Studies minor, as a capstone for the Japanese minor, or as an elective for the BA, BBA, and BS degrees. Prerequisite: ENG/CMP/LTT 2800 or 2850. 3 credits; Offered once per year.CJ Suzuki
BaruchFilmCMP / AAS / FLM4907Film and Moving Image Culture in JapanThis course explores films and moving image works in Japan from the earliest period to the present. It also provides tools as well as concepts for examining how cinematic and other visual media work and communicate with their audiences, while enhancing students’ analytic, interpretative, and argumentative skills. (Students will receive credit for only one of the following courses: AAS 4907; CMP 4907; or FLM 4907. These courses may substitute for each other in the F-replacement policy). 3 credits; Offered once per year.
BaruchHistoryHIS3345Asian American HistoryNot currently offered?
BaruchHistory & Asian and Asian American StudiesAAS3345Asian American HistoryThis course examines the history of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans from the mid-19th century to the present. The class focuses both on specific events and on broader themes such as labor, gender, religion, transnationalism, and race. It also explores the experiences of different Asian American ethnic groups in a comparative manner. This course is cross-listed with HIS 3345. Students will receive credit for either AAS 3345 or HIS 3345. These courses may not substitute for each other in the F-replacement policy. 3 credits; Offered once per year. Japanese component would be 1/4 of the course content.
BaruchHistory & Asian and Asian American StudiesAAS4900Capstone Course: Critical Issues in Asian and Asian American StudiesThis course focuses on a core issue or theme in Asian and Asian American studies. Examples of these issues include modernity, immigration, colonialism, religious toleration, gender, foreign policy, cross-cultural interactions, and interethnic relations. The course examines the selected issue through the study of primary and secondary works and the analysis of a wide variety of resources, including art, film, television, novels, newspapers, and the Internet. 3 credits; Offered once per year. Japanese component depends on the topic.
BaruchLanguageJPN1001Elementary Japanese 1This is the introductory course for elementary Japanese language. Our primary objective is to gain basic comprehension of everyday vocabulary, usage and grammar by developing skills in the four main skills of language acquisition: speaking, listening, reading and writing. 3 credits; Offered in every semester.CJ Suzuki
BaruchLanguageJPN1002Elementary Japanese 2This is the second introductory course for the elementary Japanese language. Our primary objective is to gain a basic comprehension of the everyday spoken language and grammar by further developing skills in the four areas of speaking, listening, reading and writing. 3 credits; Offered in every semester.CJ Suzuki
BaruchLanguageJPN3001Intensive Intermediate Japanese 1Japanese 3001 is an intensive course in Japanese starting with a thorough review of the grammar and vocabulary and including a study of Japanese culture and society. Emphasis is placed on the active use of the language through conversation, role-playing, small group discussions, interviews, etc. 4 credits; Offered in every semester.CJ Suzuki
BaruchLanguageJPN3002Intensive Intermediate Japanese 2Japanese 3002 is a continuation of JPN 1001-1002 and JPN 3001 with emphasis on oral proficiency and correct expression. Emphasis is placed on the active use of the language through conversation, role-playing, small group discussions, interviews, etc. 4 credits; Offered in every semester.CJ Suzuki
BaruchLanguageJPN4000Advanced Japanese Oral and Written CommunicationThis course functions as a bridge between the intermediate-level and the advanced-level Japanese courses. Special attention is placed on composition as well as on improving the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing). This course may be used as a capstone for the Japanese minor. 3 credits; Offered in every other semester.CJ Suzuki
BaruchLanguageJPN4003Japanese Contemporary Japanese Literature, Film, and CultureThis course is an advanced language course in the Baruch Japanese program. The objective of this course
is twofold: (1) to solidify and expand your foundation for grammar, vocabulary and kanji and (2) to
acquire socio-cultural knowledge for communication, thereby, easing your transition into more advanced
Japanese. Pre-requisite JPN3002 or departmental permission. 3 credits; Offered in every other semester.
CJ Suzuki
BaruchLanguageJPN4005Advanced Japanese: Learning through Content and MultimediaThis course is an advanced Japanese language course. Students will continue to improve their mastery of Japanese language skills through readings about Japanese social and cultural topics as well as multimedia online content. This course may be used as a capstone for the Japanese minor. (Students may receive credit for JPN 4005 or AAS 4005, not both. These courses may substitute for each other with the F-replacement policy). 3 credits; Offered in every other semester.CJ Suzuki
BaruchLanguageJPN4501Japanese for Global MarketThis course is designed to prepare students for effective oral and written communication in Japanese business settings. It introduces commercial and technical vocabulary used in work situations. In addition to language learning, reading in English and Japanese, film excerpts and discussions further students' understanding of Japanese culture. Students develop effective and refined verbal use built upon the knowledge of Japanese culture. 3 credits; Offered occasionally.CJ Suzuki
BaruchLanguageJPN5000 / JPN5001Independent StudyHours and credits to be arranged. Typically, 3 credits.CJ Suzuki
BaruchLiteratureCMP / AAS4905Literature, Culture, and Language in Contemporary JapanThrough readings in English and the viewing of Japanese cinema, this course introduces students to contemporary Japanese literature, language, communication styles, and cultural backgrounds. Student discussion will also consider especially pressing issues in Japan today, for example, the role and future of women in this traditionally male-oriented society.CJ Suzuki
BaruchPhilosophyPHI3990Special Topics in Philosophy / Philosophy of JapanThis course embarks on a sweeping intellectual overview of Japanese history, philosophy, politics, ethics, and metaphysics. It begins with the earliest recorded Japanese history, moving through modern Japan, and covers the heart of the economic miracle. 3 credits; Offered once per year.
BMCCArtART251Asian Art HistoryThis course investigates the history and development of Asian Art, including East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia, from the Neolithic period to the nineteenth century. We will study significant artworks, including paintings, sculpture, and architecture, in relation to the sociohistorical contexts in which they were created. We also will explore distinctive artistic styles, forms, and aesthetics of Asian art along with themes, beliefs, and diverse cultural characteristics associated with them.
BMCCHistoryASN114Asian American HistoryThe Asian American presence from the mid-nineteenth century to the present is studied. Three periods, 1848 to 1943, 1943 to 1965, and 1965 to the present are examined. Topics are designed to focus on the impact of historical processes on the cultural, economic and political experiences of diverse Asian American groups in urban and rural communities. The multi-ethnic aspects of Asian American communities are explored.
BMCCLiteratureENG339Asian American LiteratureRepresentative works reflective of the collective experiences of Asian American writers are analyzed. American writers are analyzed. Fiction, poetry, drama and non-fiction written from Chinese, Filipino, Asian Indian, Japanese, Korean and South-East Asian cultural perspectives are discussed
BCCLanguageJPN111Beginning Japanese IThis introductory language course is for beginners of Japanese. This course aims to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in modern Japanese. The course also focuses in developing mastery of the Japanese writing system for basic reading and writing. The course will introduce the overall structure of Japanese, basic vocabulary, the two syllabaries of the phonetic system, and some characters (Kanji). Students will learn Japanese customs, traditions, and culture
BrooklynRELG3005Religions of India, China, and Japan
BrooklynHIST3590Special Topics in Asian, Caribbean, Latin American, and Middle Eastern History
BrooklynHIST7562Modern South Asia
BrooklynBUSN3175Asian BusinessIntroduction and overview of the business environment in the Asia-Pacific region: China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and the ASEAN nations. Researching and entering Asian markets, Asian management theory and practice, the Asian financial crisis, identification and evaluation of risks and opportunities in Asian markets, problems faced by international firms in doing business in Asia. Designing international business in light of historical, economic, technological, political, and socio-cultural environments. Prerequisite: Economics 2100 or Business 3200 or 3100. Students majoring in business are recommended to take Business 3170 before taking this class. Juniors and seniors not majoring in accounting; business, management, and finance; or economics may take this course without any prerequisites.
BrooklynHistoryHIST353Land of the Rising Sun: Ancient and Medieval JapanJapanese civilization from prehistoric times to the late sixteenth century. Earliest Neolithic civilizations on the Japanese archipelago. Beginnings of agriculture and bronze technology. Cultural interaction with mainland Asia. Development of imperial institutions and Shinto. Adaptation of Buddhism, development of indigenous Buddhist schools (Nichiren, Zen). Evolution of Japanese literature, drama, and art. Rise of the samurai.
BrooklynHistoryHIST3538Modern JapanDevelopment of Japan as a modern nation. Tokugawa origins of modern institutions; emergence of the imperial state in the Meiji period; expansion on the Asian continent; nationalism, liberalism, and militarism between the wars. Destruction in World War II; recovery and the rise to affluence. Japan as a post-industrial power; its regional and global influence.
BrooklynLanguageJAPN1010Elementary Japanese 1First in a two-semester intensive sequence for beginners and those who have had one year or less of high school study. Introduction to phonetics and writing systems. Development of communicative skills and cultural awareness through extensive classroom interaction and a variety of multimedia materials. (Not open to heritage speakers or to students who have completed Japanese 1 or more than one year of high school Japanese.) Prerequisite: none.
BrooklynLanguageJAPN1020Elementary Japanese 2Second in a two-semester intensive sequence. Expanded acquisition of phonetics and writing systems. Development of communicative skills and cultural awareness through extensive classroom interaction and a variety of multimedia materials. Designed to prepare students for Japanese 3.1. (Not open to heritage speakers or to students who have completed Japanese 1 or 2.) Prerequisite: Japanese 1.1 or permission of the chairperson.
BrooklynLanguageJAPN1030Intermediate Japanese 1First in a two-semester intensive sequence for students who have completed Japanese 1.1 and 2.1 or the equivalent, or have had four years of high school study. Continued development of oral fluency and writing in social interaction and in systematic vocabulary building. Increased awareness of cultural diversity in areas where language is spoken. (Not open to heritage speakers or to students who have completed Japanese 3.) Prerequisite: Japanese 2.1 or permission of the chairperson.
BrooklynLanguageJAPN2010Intermediate Japanese 2Second in a two-semester intensive sequence for students who have completed Japanese 1030 [3.1] or its equivalent. Further refinement of oral fluency and writing in social interaction and in systematic vocabulary building. Expanded awareness of cultural diversity through study of literary and nonliterary texts and other media of communication. (Not open to heritage speakers or students who have completed Japanese 4.) Prerequisite: Japanese 1030 [3.1] or permission of the chairperson.
BrooklynPhilosophyPHIL3722Asian PhilosophyDevelopment of Indian thought in such sources as the Vedic hymns, the Upanishads, the Bhagavadgita, Jainism, Buddhism, and the darshana. Chinese, Indian, and Japanese thought through the ancient, medieval, and modern periods. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or Core Studies 10 or Core Curriculum 2.1 (CORC 1210).
CSICHN308Gender and Sexuality in China and Japanese LiteratureA survey on the construction of gender relations in China and Japan, from the late imperial to the contemporary era. Topics include: the representation of gender identities in literature, the patterns and politics that inform these narratives, and the relations between the construction of gender and national identities during China and Japan’s critical historical transitions.
CSILiteratureENH207Asian Literature Before 1900
CSILiteratureENL335Modern East Asian Literature
GuttmanNANA
HostosLanguageJPN101Elementary Japnaese 1This course introduces the basic elements of the Japanese language by providing a foundation in grammar, pronunciation, vocabulary and writing. Using a communicative approach, students will learn listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in cultural and social contexts.Sara Hamada
HunterJPN40301Topics in Contemporary Theater of JapanMaayan Barkan
HunterJPN40400Japanese PragmaticsMaayan Barkan
HunterJPN25200Japanese Culture since 1600Maayan Barkan
HunterTHEA39718 / JPN30301Traditional Japanese Theatre
HunterTHEA39723Topics in Contemporary Theatre of Japan
HunterARTH26300Art of East Asia: Painting and Calligraphy
HunterASIAN21000Asians in the United States
HunterASIAN22005South Asian Women's Literature
HunterASIAN22500Asian American Art
HunterASIAN23002Topics in Asian American Society: Asian American Communities and Mental Health
HunterASIAN29000Asian American Studies Internship
HunterASIAN34001Asian Pacific American Media
HunterASIAN39002Asian American Civil Rights and the Law
HunterASIAN39018Asian American Poetics
HunterPOLSC25100Politics of Africa, Asia, and Latin America
HunterJPN25100Japanese Culture Before 1600Maayan Barkan
HunterJPN26160(Re) Imagining Modern Japan: Technology Society and the Uncanny ValleyMaayan Barkan
HunterJPN403(02)Contemporary Culture of Horror in JapanMaayan Barkan
HunterJPN26161Building Nation Thru Fact/FictionMaayan Barkan
HunterJPN20N05Intermediate ConversationMaayan Barkan
HunterJPN351Advanced Japanese ConversationMaayan Barkan
HunterJPN26130(001)Introduction to Chado – Tea CeremonyMaayan Barkan
HunterJPN30401Japanese Business Communications and SkillsMaayan Barkan
HunterJPNxxxIntermediate Conversation 2Currently under development. Aiming at Spring 2021.Maayan Barkan
HunterJPN27170Japanese Kimono -- The Wearable ArtMaayan Barkan
HunterFilmFILM21354National Cinema: Japan Cinema
HunterLanguageJPN10100Elementary Japanese 1Maayan Barkan
HunterLanguageJPN102Elementary Japanese 2Maayan Barkan
HunterLanguageJPN20100Intermediate Japanese 1Maayan Barkan
HunterLanguageJPN20200Intermediate Japanese 2Maayan Barkan
HunterLanguageJPN27100Japanese Reading: Recitation and ComprehensionMaayan Barkan
HunterLanguageJPN30100Advanced Japanese 1Maayan Barkan
HunterLanguageJPN30200Advanced Japanese 2Maayan Barkan
HunterLanguageJPN30302Classical Japanese Literature and The Way of TeaMaayan Barkan
HunterReligionREL25100Asian Religions
John JaySOC351Crime and Delinquency in Asia
John JayLanguageJPN101Elementary Japanese 1This course provides pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, reading, and character writing (hiragana, katakana, and elementary kanji) exercises in spoken Japanese. Emphasis is placed primarily on developing speaking, listening, reading and writing skills at the novice low level. The study of Japanese culture and its history are also emphasized. / About 3-4 sections run every semester (Fall and Spring). Textbook is Genki (Ch.1-Ch.4).
John JayLanguageJPN102Elementary Japanese 2This course builds upon the basis of Japanese 101 and aims to develop the linguistic, communicative and cultural competence in order to interact with native speakers of Japanese in a culturally coherent and appropriate manner. Emphasis is placed on the development of writing and oral communication skills, as well as of understanding cultural aspects. / About 2 sections run every semester (Fall and Spring). Textbook is Genki (Ch.5-Ch.8).
John JayLanguageJPN201Intermediate Japanese 1This course is designed for students who have prior knowledge of the Japanese language, mainly through Elementary Japanese I and II, or equivalent courses. The objectives of the course are to advance students' fluency as well as accuracy in speech and listening comprehension, to develop students' reading and writing skills, and to increase their understanding of modern Japanese culture through authentic materials. / Usually 1 section is offered in Fall semesters. Textbook is Genki (Ch.9-Ch.12).
John JayLanguageJPN292Intermediate Japanese 2This course is designed for students who have prior knowledge of the Japanese language through the Intermediate I level. The objectives of the course are to advance students' fluency, as well as to improve their accuracy in speech and listening comprehension, to develop students' reading and writing skills, and to increase their understanding of modern Japanese culture through authentic materials. / Usually 1 section is offered in Spring semesters. Textbook is Genki (Ch.13-Ch.16).
John JaySociologySOC351Crime and Delinquency in Asia
KingsboroughArtART2300Asian Art through Religion, Philosophy, and Politics This course focuses on the nature and extent of crime and delinquency and the social context in which crime occurs in Asian countries. Comparisons of crime and delinquency in various Asian nations will be made with reference to economic development and the social status of women and children. Special topics such as dowry murders in India, Yakuza gangs in Japan, and Chinese triads will be discussed.
LaGuardiaHistorySSH110East Asian Civilization and SocietiesThis course uses primary and secondary sources to examine the historical development of East Asian societies from the origins of civilization to the present day. Using thematic and chronological approaches, the course considers the cultural, religious, philosophical, and political phenomena that have shaped China, Korea, and Japan. Throughout the course, students will gain an appreciation for the growing political
and economic influence of this region in the world today.
Robin Kietlinski
LaGuardiaHistorySSH114Modern Japanese HistoryThis course will cover the history of Japan from the beginning of the Tokugawa era (1600) to the present, with the goal of providing a comprehensive understanding of the political, economic, and sociocultural changes that occurred during this period. Throughout the course we will consider such themes
as isolationism, fascism, imperialism, democracy, minorities, capitalism and gender in the context of modern Japan.
Robin Kietlinski
LaGuardiaLanguageELJ101Elementary Japanese 1This course aims to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Japanese. Knowledge of Japanese culture is also nourished through the examination of social practices, cultural products, and perspectives in Japan. Writing and reading of Hiragana and Katakana skills will be introduced as well. / About 3-4 sections run every semester, including winter and summer. Textbook is Genki (Ch.1-Ch.5).Tomonori Nagano
LaGuardiaLanguageELJ102Elementary Japanese 2This course is a continuation of ELJ101 Elementary Japanese 1. The course is designed to further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing within appropriate cultural context. While the main emphasis is placed on the spoken language, reading and writing of the Japanese scripts, including approximately 50-60 Kanji (Chinese characters), are gradually introduced. / Note: About 2 sections run every semester, including winter and summer. Textbook is Genki (Ch.6-Ch.10).Tomonori Nagano
LaGuardiaLanguageELJ103Intermediate Japanese 1This course is a continuation of ELJ102 Elementary Japanese 2. The course is designed to further develop functional language proficiency and increase students' ability to communicate accurately in Japanese within an appropriate socio-cultural context. The four communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing are emphasized in various cultural contexts. Particular attention is paid to sentence and paragraph structure, grammatical features, and oral and written fluency. The knowledge of the Kanji (Chinese characters) writing system will also be reinforced. / 1 section runs every year. Textbook is Genki (Ch.11-Ch.15).Tomonori Nagano
LaGuardiaLanguageELJ104Intermediate Japanese 2This course is a continuation of ELJ103 and is designed to further develop functional language proficiency and increase students' ability to communicate accurately in Japanese within an appropriate socio-cultural context. In addition to the four communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, students will develop their ability to speak and write Japanese in different registers, particularly in the formal register. Knowledge of Kanji (Chinese characters) will be reinforced. / 1 section runs every year. Textbook is Genki (Ch.16-Ch.20).Tomonori Nagano
LaGuardiaLanguageELJ105Japanese for Heritage SpeakersThis course is designed to help heritage speakers of Japanese enhance their reading and writing competence of Japanese in the formal and high-level register. The class especially focuses on Japanese grammar, pragmatics, usage, and students' critical reading and writing strategies in Japanese through project-based assignments. The class is taught mostly in Japanese. / This course is often taught as an individualized/independent study. Contact Tomonori Nagano (tnagano@lagcc.cuny.edu).Tomonori Nagano
LaGuardiaLiteratureELJ250Japanese Literature in TranslationThis course is an introduction to Japanese literature in English translation. Selected classics of Japanese literature representative of the major genres from the early to the modern period will be read and discussed. Thematic and stylistic variety of various genres will be explored. Knowledge of the Japanese language is not required.Tomonori Nagano
LehmanHIW325The History of Modern Japan
LehmanHIS240East Asian Civilization
LehmanHIW316East Asia in the Modern World
LehmanLanguageJAL111Elementary Japanese 1
LehmanLanguageJAL201Intermediate Japanese 1
LehmanLanguageJAL301Advanced Japanese 1
LehmanLanguageJAL381Tutorial In Japanese
CityTechArtARTH1108Art of AsiaCourse description: An introduction to the major artistic developments in China, India, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia from ancient to modern times. The works of art will be discussed in their cultural context.Zhijian Qian
CityTechHistoryHIS1201Contemporary Civilizations of AsiaCourse description: An examination of the peoples of Asia, focusing on the economic, political, social, and cultural characteristics of Asia. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between Asia and the West.
QueensEAST251Modern Japanese Fiction in TranslationReadings in English translation of modern Japanese fiction from the late nineteenth century to the present. Through close readings of selected texts by a wide range of authors (as well as by viewing films where appropriate), the course will examine such issues as problems of representation; the language, form, and position of the ønovelø; modernization/westernization vs. the øtraditionø; modernity and nationalism; gender, family, and society.Mari Fujimoto
QueensEAST 255WThe Tale of Genji and Early Japanese Women's WritingThe course will approach Shikibu's The Tale of Genji both as the seminal literary fiction of the Japanese tradition and as a predecessor to the modern psychological novel. The readings, in English translations, will include important texts by other 11th-century Japanese women writers, and selections from medieval critical commentaries.Mari Fujimoto
QueensEAST131Introduction to Modern JapanMari Fujimoto
QueensAACS370Field Work in Asian American Communities-Opportunities for Service Learning and Research
QueensANTH216Peoples of Southeast Asia
QueensARTH114Survey of Asian Art
QueensEAST130WEast Asian ReligionMari Fujimoto
QueensEAST230East Asian Civilization ISelected topics in the civilizations of pre-modern East Asia (from ancient times through the Tøang dynasty in China, and from ancient times through the medieval period in Japan), with an emphasis on literary, philosophical, and visual culture. No knowledge of Chinese or Japanese is necessary. EAST 230 and 235 are complements of each other and may be taken in either order.Mari Fujimoto
QueensEAST235East Asian Civilization IISelected topics in the civilizations of pre-modern East Asia (from the Sung dynasty through the twentieth century in China and from the Tokugawa period through the twentieth century in Japan), with an emphasis on literary, philosophical, and visual culture. No knowledge of Chinese or Japanese is necessary. EAST 230 and 235 are complements of each other and may be taken in either order.Mari Fujimoto
QueensEAST380Research Seminar in East Asian StudiesMari Fujimoto
QueensHIST112Introduction to East Asian History
QueensPSCI238Contemporary Asia
QueensAACS220Asian American Communities: Culture, Power, and Agency
QueensARTH507Vt: Asian Art
QueensDANCE164Asian Performing Arts
QueensEAST290Topics in East Asian StudiesMari Fujimoto
QueensENGL377VT: Modern South Asian Literature
QueensPSCI258Asia in World Politics
QueensLanguageJPNS101Elementary Japanese IAn introduction to the modern language with emphasis on using spoken Japanese in context. Students learn hiragana and katakana.Mari Fujimoto
QueensLanguageJPNS102Elementary Japanese IIA continuation of JPNS 101. Spoken exercises are increased as more of the modern language is learned. Approximately 125 Chinese characters are introduced.Mari Fujimoto
QueensLanguageJPNS203Intermediate Japanese IA continuation of Japanese 102 with greater emphasis on reading and writing as well as an introduction to literary Japanese.Mari Fujimoto
QueensLanguageJPNS204Intermediate Japanese IIA continuation of JPNS 203. Students will prepare sophisticated spoken exercises and begin to read texts of intermediate difficulty.Mari Fujimoto
QueensLanguageJPNS305Advanced Modern Japanese IStudents will read texts of intermediate difficulty, write essays, and perform sophisticated oral exercises in the form of speeches, skits, or other simulated situations. Emphasis is placed on idiomatic usage of the modern language. Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be determined, in part, by student goals and interests.Mari Fujimoto
QueensLanguageJPNS306Advanced Modern Japanese IIMari Fujimoto
QCCArtARTH126History of Asian Art
City CollegeART21054Art of China, Japan, and Korea
City CollegeASIA31611Contemporary Japan
City CollegeHIST 25500Modern JapanThis course introduces students to the modern transformation of Japan from 1868 to the present. It examines how Japan changed from a pre-industrial society managed by samurai-bureaucrats into an expansionist imperial power, which was then followed by its post-World War II "economic miracle." We will explore changes and continuities in Japanese foreign relations, politics, society, and culture, and how these impacted the lives of Japanese citizens at home and imperial subjects abroad.Seiji Shirane
City CollegeHIST B2609Japanese Empire (MA Seminar)Between 1895 and 1945, Japan was the first non-Western power to build an extensive empire in Asia. This course examines the nature of Japanese imperial rule in Asia by focusing on colonial Taiwan (1895-1945) and colonial Korea (1905-1945). Although Japan's empire fell in 1945, the legacies of its empire have continued to shape Japan, Taiwan, and Korea's relations not only with each other but also with neighboring countries in Asia today.Seiji Shirane
City CollegeASIA31104Modern Japanese Literature and FilmsThis class is offered in falls
City CollegeASIA10100Asian Cultures and Peoples
City CollegeASIA20200Contemporary AsiaThis introductory course will approach the society, and culture of East Asia from the standpoint that our understanding of the present must be grounded in history. We will seek continuities and discontinuities in history. Early twentieth-century feminism in Japan, for example, will be contrasted with the barriers faced by Japanese women today. The course will rely on a variety of sources, including historical texts, works of art, and contemporary media reports. The semester will begin with a brief introduction to Confucian and Shinto beliefs, and the Chinese examination system, all of which shaped life in East Asia before the modern era and remain relevant today. We will then focus on the dramatic political, social, and cultural changes that occurred in China, Japan, and Korea as these states interacted with the West and each other in the 20th century, touching on revolutions in China, and the Japanese occupations of Korea and China. We will then consider East Asia today, including economic growth in China, recession in Japan, and how these phenomena are experienced and expressed by diverse people. The global popularity of Korean
culture—“K-pop”—will be explored at the end of the course.
Lara Netting
City CollegePeoples and Cultures of AsiaThis class will investigate Asia, primarily China and Japan, but also Korea, Tibet, and Mongolia, through artifacts. Artifacts are the material traces of culture and include both historic and contemporary items. The objects we will examine range from a 3000-year- old Chinese oracle bone to a contemporary Japanese animated film. Considering materials, form, function, and symbolic meanings, we will practice how to read artifacts to understand the peoples who make and use them. The course will highlight ethnic diversity within East Asia, as well as the long history of exchange between China, Japan, and other peoples across the globe.Lara Netting
City CollegeASIA31127Cultural Identity in East AsiaThis class is offered in springs
City CollegeASIA31170Japanese Popular CultureThis class hasn't been offered since Fall 2017
City CollegeASIA31610Japanese Popular CultureThis class is offered in springs
City CollegeFilmASIA31808Asian Film
City CollegeFilmASIA31116Japanese FilmsThis class hasn't been offered since Spring 2015
City CollegeFilmASIA31911The Films of Hirokazu Koreeda
City CollegeHistoryHIST31176War in Modern East AsiaThis course examines wars in East Asia and their impact on the societies of Japan, China, Korea, and Southeast Asia from 1800 to the present. Topics include the First Sino-Japanese War (1894-95), Russo-Japanese War (1904-5), Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-45), Pacific War (1941-45), Cold War in Asia, and the historical legacies of these conflicts today.Seiji Shirane
City CollegeHistoryHIST31178Japanese-Chinese RelationsThis course explores major political, social, cultural, and economic exchanges between China and Japan from 1800 to the present. Topics include mutual perceptions, travel, imperialism, Orientalism, Pan-Asianism, and debates between the two countries over post-war territory and historical memory.Seiji Shirane
City CollegeHistoryB0016-GHThe Pacific War (1931-1945)This course will explore the "long" Pacific War (1931-1945) and it's social, economic, and cultural impact on Japan, China, and the United States. We will examine issues such as the origins of Japanese and American imperial rivalry in Asia; how the war affected mutual perceptions between Japanese, Americans, and Chinese; the transition in U.S.- Japan relations from Pacific War enemies to post-war allies; and the contested legacies and memories of the war in present-day Asia.Seiji Shirane
City CollegeLanguageJAP12300Introductory Japanese IThis class is offered in fallsRichard Calichman
City CollegeLanguageJAP12400Introductory Japanese IIThis class is offered in springsRichard Calichman
City CollegeLanguageJAP22600Intermediate JapaneseThis class is offered in fallsRichard Calichman
City CollegeLanguageJAP30500Conversational JapaneseThis class is offered in springsRichard Calichman
YorkAntholopologyANTH242Ethnology and Ethnography of AsiaANTH242 (Liberal Arts) Ethnology and Ethnography of Asia 3 hrs. 3 crs. Survey of traditional and contemporary societies of a given area; their exposure to a changing world and their responses. Preq: ANTH 101. Not open to students with credit in ANTH 342. Not offered on a regular basis. Availability to be determined by the department.
YorkCultureCLDV202Cultures and Societies of the World: The Far East and South East AsiaCLDV202 (Liberal Arts) Cultures and Societies of the World: The Far East and South East Asia 3 hrs. 3 crs. Study of the major post WW II demographic, geo-political and societal changes in China, Japan, Korea and other Southeast Asian nations. Historical and philosophical traditions including Buddhism and Confucianism and the impact of Western philosophy in traditional thought. An assessment of contemporary cultural values, beliefs, mores, religion and family structure. The impact of urbanization and industrialization on gender, race and class. An introduction to literary and artistic expressions and contributions with special attention to women writers. Preq: CLDV 101 or CLDV 100; ENG 125.
YorkHistoryHIST101Pacific Century: The Emergence of Modern Pacific AsiaHIST101 (Liberal Arts) Pacific Century: The Emergence of Modern Pacific Asia 3 hrs. 3 crs. Introduction to Asia and the Pacific area as we approach the twenty-first century. Themes in regional history emphasize the interaction between cultures and nations and evaluate domestic, political, economic and cultural trends in what is called the Pacific Basin. Preq: ENG 125. Coreq: ENG 125. Not offered on a regular basis. Availability to be determined by the department.
YorkHistoryHIST257East Asia to the Nineteenth CenturyHIST257 (Liberal Arts) East Asia to the Nineteenth Century 3 hrs. 3 crs. Introduction to political, military, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural developments in East Asian civilization; China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam (Annam) from the earliest times to the 19th century. Preq: ENG 125.
YorkHistoryHIST258East Asia from 1800 to the PresentHIST258 (Liberal Arts) East Asia from 1800 to the Present 3 hrs. 3 crs. Introduction to the political, military, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural aspects of the modernization of East Asia; China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam from 1800 to the present. Preq: ENG 125. 3 hours lecture.
YorkHistoryHIST354Modern JapanHIST354 (Liberal Arts) Modern Japan 3 hrs. 3 crs. Major political, military, economic, social, and intellectual developments in Japan from the late 18th century to the present. Preq: ENG 125 and three credits of History. Offered alternate years. (offered Alternate Years)
YorkHistoryHUM281Introduction to Eastern ReligionHUM281 (Liberal Arts) Introduction to Eastern Religion 3 hrs. 3 crs. Methods and problems in the interpretation of religious phenomena; emphasis on major religions of the East, founders, scriptures, ideas, and moral standards; influence of Eastern religions on life and thought of Asiatic peoples. Preq: ENG 125. Not offered on a regular basis. Availability to be determined by the department.
YorkReligionHUM283Mahayana BuddhismHUM283 (Liberal Arts) Mahayana Buddhism 3 hrs. 3 crs. Buddhism in Tibet, China, and Japan; history and thought of northern Buddhism and its interaction with indigenous religions; readings in Mahayana literature in translation and a study of Chinese and Japanese Buddhist sects. Preq: ENG 125. Not offered on a regular basis. Availability to be determined by the department.
YorkPolitical SciencePOL257Asian PoliticsPOL257 (Liberal Arts) Asian Politics 3 hrs. 3 crs. Political development in selected Asian nations; emphasis on the independence movements, nationalism, political parties, and pressure groups. Preq: 3 credits in Political Science or permission of the instructor.